“I want the fastest possible, new RS/AMG/M car!” That’s something that I, and probably lots of you, have thought when considering which new model to go for. For enthusiasts like us, it’s the natural way to think about your next purchase. So, when I was testing, not the second most powerful, but third down the list of quickest Audi A5 based models, the 2.0l TFSI, I was surprised to start thinking that it might be the pick of the bunch.

You’re probably already thinking that I should hand in my V-Power card, but bear with me.




Audi’s latest A5 is a striking bit of design from a company that has been ultra-conservative over the last 10 years. Plum for the RS5 or S5 variety and they do look more purposeful, but the difference is nowhere near as large as it was on say they B5 RS4 compared to a rep spec model.

Let’s start by looking at the stats for three of the petrol models:
A5 2.0 TFSI, 252 PS, 370Nm 1,390 kg, 181PS/ton (remap to 300PS = 215PS/ton)
S5, 354PS, 500Nm, 1,660 kg, 213PS/ton
RS5, 450PS, 600Nm, 1,665 kg, 270Ps/ton

There’s no denying how much of a monster the RS5 is, however with a simple 500 remap the 2.0 TFSI can achieve a higher PS/ton then the S5.

Stats are all well and interesting but it’s how the cars feel on the road that counts, and this is where the 2.0l impresses most. While I’ve not driven the current RS5, what the smaller engined A5 has going for it is weight, or lack thereof. Get yourself onto a twisty bit of country road and it actually feels a lot more nimble than you might expect.



I managed to get myself out for a few spirited runs but didn’t find time for taking the car on my goto challenge road, the B743 Strathaven to Muirkirk.

While many people will be used to this engine in the Golf/Leon/Octavia, the A5 feels much like a true sports car with its coupe styling and lower driving position. It’s easy to forget just how much more enjoyable this setup is when going for a fun drive as opposed to the normal daily grind.

Power wise, the car feels quick enough that you’ll be having fun. It’s not going to pin you to the seat back and the noise is good, rather than shouty and exciting. Mash the throttle when exiting a corner or go for an overtake and there’s enough grunt to make this feel like a genuine, junior sports car.




Traction, as you would expect from the Quattro system, is brilliant and I was surprised at just how sharp the steering felt. Take the A5 through a series of corners at speed and it handled very well, with very little pitch. The brakes also seemed more than up to the job – although, as I mentioned before, this wasn’t as full a workout as I’d hoped to give the car.

Inside the A5 is very much what you would expect from Audi. The seats are comfortable, the controls are well laid out and the paddle shifters are nicely placed. The A5 is undoubtedly a pleasant and quiet place to spend time.

Practicality wise, the A5 is exactly what you would expect from a small coupe. I used the car for a family trip (wife, two year old and new born) and while it managed ok, and the boot did a pretty good job of swallowing everything, this isn’t something I’d like to do on a regular basis.





Summing up the A5 is difficult. I was pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed driving it but I kept wondering if the TT, with the same engine, would have been more fun and if I’d rather have the practicality of the A4. The current Audi range really does have something to suit every circumstance. Given a free choice, and without budget constraints, I’d probably still plum for the monstrous RS5....or RS4 or RS6.....